White and Orange Books – Beezone Project

“You had better understand the difference between getting to know or learning in the sacred manner, in the Guru-devotee relationship, and getting knowledge in the abstracted, self-contracted ego-based manner of ordinary schooling.

If you understand something of that difference, then you understand, or are further sensitized to, what you must go beyond in every moment in My Company. You will tend to use the pattern of ego-learning in your approach to Me. You will tend to use it, therefore, when you approach My Word, or when you approach Me in My bodily (human) Form, or listen to Me speak. You will approach Me in the ordinary, secular manner, the worldly manner, and it will not serve your Realization… even though you might find something interesting or entertaining about it. But it won’t serve the process of your Realization… unless you understand the nature of Guru-devotion, Guru-bhakti, Guru-bhava.”
Adi Da Samraj – 1996

 

Beezone White and Orange Project* is a study method based on Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Blue & Brown Books books. The Blue & Brown Books of Wittgenstein’s were dictated as a set of notes to his student in 1934-1935.

Beezone uses a number of formats for assembling a project. One method is called a ‘Notes’. In this method Beezone presents an essay or talk directly from Adi Da and then will write down the highlighted points from the talk or essay (see example).

A second format is in ‘thematic’ style. Beezone will take a ‘theme’ of Adi Da’s teaching and go through various talks and essays and write down a sentence or two related to that theme or topic (see example).

Another form or style Beezone uses is a compilation or remix. This is a blend of the two other methods. In this style Beezone will take a number of talks and essays based on a theme (see example). Beezone will then use the ‘cut-up’ method. The cut-up technique is an aleatory literary technique in which a text is cut up and rearranged to create a new text. This method can be traced to at least the Dadaists of the 1920s, but was popularized in the late 1950s and early 1960s by writer William S. Burroughs, and has since been used in a wide variety of contexts.

 

More Adi Da library materials – Adi Da Articles – page 2


 

Old Magazines of the Adi Da Community (1974-1992)


www.divinedistraction.com





  For more information on Adi Da Samraj

go to:

Adidam.org