Three Teachings of the One Way, The


XXII

The Three Teachings of the One Way

There are three principal Transcendentalist (or sixth
to seventh stage) Teachings: Realist Buddhism (or Realist Transcendentalism),
Idealist Advaitism (or Idealist Transcendentalism), and Advaitayana Buddhism
(or Radical Transcendentalism).

The Buddhist Teaching of Realism is epitomized in the
considerations of Gautama, and the Realization based on that Teaching is
epitomized in texts such as the Lankavatara Stra and the Sixth Patriarch’s
Altar Sutra. In this view, manifest existence, seen in itself, is regarded
to be unnecessary suffering. The Way is to inspect every aspect of self,
mind, body, and the world and see that every part is conditional, temporary,
limited, and merely the result or effect of other conditional, temporary,
and limited motions or events. When this inspection has become most profound,
then it is obvious that no part of self, mind, body, or the world is anything
but a form of conditional motion—an effect of previous motions and a cause
of motions that will follow it. Therefore, it becomes obvious that Happiness
is not in the form of any part of self, mind, body, or the world—or any
form of effect or cause. The Truth is Transcendental (prior to effect and
cause), and the Realization of Truth is a matter of Awakening to the acausal
(or Nirvanic) Condition on the basis of first inspecting and transcending
attachment (and conceptual confinement) to all forms of cause (or desire,
or motivation, or motion) and all forms of effect (or self, mind, body,
or world).

The Advaitist Teaching of Idealism is epitomized in the
considerations of the Yoga Vasishtha and the philosophers Gaudapada and
Shankara, and the Realization based on that Teaching is epitomized in the
Confessions of Adepts such as Ashtavakra and Ramana Maharshi. In this view,
manifest existence, seen in itself, is regarded to be an unnecessary illusion.
The Way is not merely to turn attention away from the world, the body,
the mind, and the self, but to turn or invert it toward the Transcendental
Self or Consciousness in which the thought of self (or “I”),
all other thoughts, and the experiential conception of the body and the
world are arising. If this is done most profoundly, then the illusory independence
of the phenomenal self, mind, body, and world will vanish in the Bliss
of Unconditional Being. Therefore, it becomes finally obvious that self,
mind, body, and world are not in any sense or to any degree independent
from the Transcendental Self-Source, and it also becomes obvious that self,
mind, body, and world have no necessity or binding power when viewed in
the context of the Transcendental Self. The Truth is the Transcendental
Self-Reality, and the Realization of Truth is a matter of Awakening to
the Original or Natural and Native State of Identification with that Self-Reality
on the basis of the inversion (or conversion) of attention into its noumenous
Ground.

The Teaching of Advaitayana Buddhism (or Radical Transcendentalism)
and the demonstration of its Way of Realization have their origin and epitome
in my own Teaching Work. In this view, manifest existence is not a problem
to be solved or escaped, but it is simply to be always already understood
(and thus natively and naturally transcended, but not strategically avoided
or egoically embraced). The Way is to observe that all problems and all
seeking for solutions arise on the basis of self-contraction (or the Narcissistic
effort that is the ego). Therefore, it is a matter of constantly observing,
re-cognizing (or knowing again), and transcending this self-contraction
(which is chronically manifested as the avoidance of relationship in the
midst of all the kinds of psycho-physical relations).

When this process of understanding has become most profound,
the relations, activities, and states of body and mind will have all been
observed and felt beyond, so that only the most primary evidence of the
self-contraction remains in view. That of relatedness. Therefore, the ultimate
exercise, by which a natural transition is made to the seventh stage of
life, is to recognize the sense of relatedness itself (which is the primal
cognition or root-event of conditional existence, on the basis of which
both the separate self and its apparently independent objects of all kinds
are subsequently and simultaneously conceived and differentiated). The
sense of relatedness is itself to be recognized as contraction, directly,
free of any strategic resort to introversion upon the self or to extroversion,
beyond direct cognition of the sense of relatedness itself, into the wandering
of attention in the differentiated field of objects. When this ultimate
form of re-cognition is most profound, the Consciousness in which self,
mind, body, world, or all forms of contracrion are arising stands forth
as the Obvious Reality, and Its Status as the Divine or Transcendental
Identity and Condition of self and notself is also inherently Obvious.
Since Reality, or the Real Condition, is necessarily That which is always
already the case, prior to all subsequent acts that cause It to appear
other than It is, the re-cognition of all such acts, or of the primary
action that is the root-constant of all such acts, necessarily and naturally
or inevitably Reveals That as the Obvious. That which is ultimately Obvious
is the ultimately Real. And the Obvious, prior to all forms of contraction,
and prior to the cognition of separate self, its objects, or the primary
sense of relatedness, is unqualified consciousness, or Radiant Transcendental
Being.

In the view of Advaitayana Buddhism, the Truth is Radiant
Transcendental Being, Consciousness, Love-Bliss, or Happiness, and all
arising conditions are transparent, or merely apparent, unnecessary, and
non-binding modifications of That. Realization of That is a matter of the
inspection, re-cognition, and inherent transcendence of the self-contraction,
which is conventionally perceived via the dual sense of separate self and
the otherness of all conditions that confront the self, but which is singly
or most basically evident in the sense of relatedness itself (prior to
the conventional distinctions and elaborations of the play between self
and not-self).

All three of these most basic and unique Transcendentalist
Teachings ultimately involve a practice and a Realization that goes beyond
or transcends the world, the body, the mind, and the separate or egoic
self. But there is no such transcendence until there is in fact such transcendence.
Therefore, until the Way becomes most profound, practice is inevitably
associated with various disciplines of the body-mind and attention. But
the purpose of such disciplines is always secondary or supportive to the
ultimate consideration, or the practice and process in consciousness. Therefore,
the basic purpose of the supportive discipdnes s to release energy and
attention from the bind of egoic habituation, so that the conscious process
may become most profound.

The traditions of Buddhist Realism and Advaitist Idealism
are the two Great Schools coming out of the two primary ancient streams
of consideration—or the “realistic” and “idealistic”
traditions of philosophy. Buddhist Realism is a Transcendentalist philosophy
that founds its Argument on the language of “realism,” and that
language is specifically intended as a criticism of the speculative metaphysical
and “eternalistic” views of the tradition of subjective “idealism.”
Even so, the Way of Buddhist Realism eventually leads to a Realization
that transcends all of the conventions and structures (or “dharmas”)
of “realism” (all of which are, from the beginning, regarded
as unnecessary suffering). In contrast to the tradition of Buddhist Realism,
Advaitist Idealism is a Transcendentalist philosophy that founds its Argument
on the language of subjective “idealism” and that language is
specifically intended as a criticism of the “nihilistic” tendencies
of the “realist” position. Even so, the Way of Advaitist Idealism
eventually leads to a Realization that transcends the Narcissistic or world-excluding
subjectivism of conventional “idealism.” Advaitayana Buddhism,
which is only now appearing, epitomizes the Transcendental tradition as
a whole, but the language of its Argument transcends the conventional limitations
of both “realism” and “idealism,” so that, from the
beginning, its Way transcends the orientations of the two ancient attitudes
of Realist Buddhism is the Way that Realizes the Transcendental Truth beyond
the not-self (or all phenomenal conditions—all of which, including the
ego, bear the characteristic of not-self or no-self).

Idealist Advaitism is the Way that Realizes the Transcendental
Truth beyond the self (and thus also beyond all that is notself, or all
the insentient phenomenal relations of the conscious phenomenal self—all
of which relations bear the illusory appearance of independence from the
conscious self).

Advaitayana Buddhism is the Way that Realizes the Transcendental
Truth beyond (or prior to) the primary sense or cognition of relatedness,
which is the single basis or prior and original sign of the subsequent
and simultaneously arising pair of opposites—the self and the not-self.
Both the self and the not-self are simply apparent (and apparently different
or opposite) aspects of the same unnecessary contraction from the Condition
of Radiant Transcendental Being, and neither of them is directly and finally
transcended unless the conventionally unconscious or uninspected contraction
is directly inspected in the form of the primary sense of relatedness.

The Transcendental Truth realized via each of these three
principal Ways is the same. The Way that is chosen depends, apart from
the karma or accident of mere cultural proximity, on the quality or kind
of intelligence that moves the individual. And the Way of Advaitayana Buddhism
(or Radical Transcendentalism) is the epitome or ultimate fulfillment and
single form of the two separate Ways conceived according to the logical
opposites of Buddhist Realism and Advaitist Idealism.

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