Beezone


Beezone – Adapted from
The
Dawn Horse Testament
Chapter
16

Adi Da Samraj


There are Seven Possible Stages in that Ordeal of
the Heart

 

The way of the heart is the way of transcendence of the
self-contraction, or more and more perfect inherence in the
self-existing and self-radiant condition of divine being. It
is the way of devotion of the conditional self, rather than
any ego-based search for self-fulfillment and
self-release.

The way of the heart is not a strategic and
self-concerned path of self-development. The way of the
heart is the way of inherent and heart-responsive devotion
to the by me revealed spiritual, transcendental, and divine
reality.

Practice of the way of the heart is a self-transcending
ordeal that matures in the context of each of the first six
stages of life. The full maturity of that ordeal is
demonstrated in the ultimate context of the seventh stage of
life. And the total ordeal of the heart evolves through a
process of progressive acknowledgement and realization of
me, and eventual and progressive acknowledgement and
realization of the spiritual, transcendental, and divine
forms of god, truth, or reality.

The first great ordeal of the way of the heart is the
progressive process of listening and hearing. That ordeal is
based on progressive acknowledgement and realization of me,
through “consideration” of my word and my leelas, and
through feeling-contemplation of, especially, my bodily
human form.

Thus, through effective practice of the way of the heart
in the context of the first three stages of life, there is
gradual and inevitable release of the stress of egoity in
the context of the frontal personality and the binding
patterns associated with the earliest stages of human
adaptation and development. This process begins with
listening, and it advances toward the realization of
hearing.

Each of the stages of life is associated with a unique
form of human adaptation and growth. And each form of
adaptation is associated with a specific human organ.

The first three stages of life occur within the context
of the lower organ functions of human adaptation, and, in
that context, human development is associated with
individuation, socialization, and integration of the
psycho-physical patterns of the frontal personality.

The first stage of life is the process of psycho-physical
individuation, based on identification with the separate and
personal gross physical body in the waking state. The first
stage of life is also associated with the oral function. At
birth, the infant is separated from the situation of unity
with the human mother, and this begins a struggle with the
fact of individual existence. This struggle is displayed in
the context of oral dependence on the mother as a separate
body. Whatever occurs in the drama of breast-feeding and the
transition to food sources apart from the mothers body,
human beings tend to develop a fundamental reactive habit at
this stage.

Un-happy individuation tends to be associated with a
feeling of separation and, thus, only a partial willingness
to relinquish the feeling of dependency on the mother. This
feeling of separation ultimately involves the sense of
disconnection from the ultimate source of support and love,
and it also becomes a general doubt or anxiety about other
human beings on whom one depends for love.
Sex-differentiation begins even at this stage, but all
relationships are experienced from the viewpoint of
dependency and reluctance to accept the situation of
individuated existence.

The second stage of life is the process of socialization,
based on the development of emotional sensitivity to the
psycho-physical self to others, and to the natural world.
The second stage of life is also associated with the anal
function and the conflict between privacy and the search for
social visibility.

The anal function begins to develop coincident with the
oral function, but socialization itself truly begins only
after the basic struggle with individuation has reached a
workable settlement.

Character motivations that are rooted in the biology and
psychology of sex-differentiation are, in the second stage
of life, extended and developed in an expanded social
context, and individuation, rather than ambiguously
differentiated dependency, becomes a catalyst toward social
exploration.

When individuation has become a workable egoic
settlement, the individual begins to struggle, as an
individual, with relationships. The second stage individual
tends to continue to function in the context of dependency,
but with a more fully developed sense of separate self,
independence, and mobility. Likewise, there is a gradual
discovery that there are many kinds of relationships, and
all of them carry a test, a demand, and an obstacle that
offends the want to be dependent. The anal phase of
development represents an early stage of self-awareness, in
which the individuals self-esteem is apparently at stake.
Thus, doubt of the ego-self and doubt of the love in others
appears. And so, the second stage of life tends to develop
only to the degree of a tentative resolution of the
relational and social character. Whereas the feeling of
separation characterizes the first stage reaction, the
feeling of being rejected characterizes the second stage
reaction.

The third stage of life is the process of integration of
the psycho-physical patterns of the frontal personality, by
means of the development and application of the functions of
mind, discriminative intelligence, and the will. And this
process is also associated with the genital phase of human
development. Genital development and sex-differentiation
begin even in infancy, and the emotional trial of the second
stage of life relates to the sexually defined character, but
the great struggle of integration and self-presentation
takes place only after puberty. The third stage of life
tends to be wasted by indulgence in patterns that may be
called adolescent. That is to say, the third stage of life
does not tend toward full resolution, because the first two
stages of life tend to be unresolved. As a result, the third
stage of life becomes a fruitless drama of conflict between
two alternating and contrary impulses, the one toward
infantile and childish dependence, and the other toward
willful and rebellious independence. The life-process is
disturbed by this un-happy and irresponsible drama, and the
mental faculties and the integrating function of the will
are thus impaired or retarded in their ability to develop
the true adult character, which character is characterized
by basic human equanimity, discriminative intelligence,
responsive heart-feeling, and the active impulse to always
continue to grow.

I have equipped the progressive culture of practitioners
of the way of the heart with wisdom and means relative to
every stage of life. Therefore, the responsive community of
formally acknowledged practitioners of the way of the heart
is empowered to serve the right, true, and free development
of children and young persons in the first three stages of
life.

In the context of the first three stages of life,
children and young people should be helped to adapt to the
requirements of growth in those stages, but in such a manner
that the egoic tendencies do not inhibit and retard that
growth through the introduction of infantile, childish, and
adolescent patterns of un-happiness. To this end, the
responsive community of true practitioners of the way of the
heart must apply all its by me given wisdom relative to the
development of children and young persons in the context of
the first three stages of life. And part of that wisdom is
the consistent cultural introduction of the by me given
rudimentary propositions and practices associated with the
fourth stage of life. Therefore, i have provided extensive
guidance for truly human growth in the context of the first
three stages of life. In my work with children, young
people, and adults, i have developed a wisdom-culture for
the first three stages of life that includes the physical,
psychological, and social processes of individuation,
socialization, and integration. That wisdom-culture also
goes beyond the limits of these obligatory early-life
processes by founding them in the true religion of real
truth. That true religion only serves and does not retard
freedom, responsibility, and growth. That culture of
devotion to truth really serves self-discipline,
self-transcendence, the vision of unity, and the realization
of freedom through god-sensitive prayer and meditation. And
that culture of devotion to truth rightly and progressively
includes exercises to develop emotional and physical
sensitivity to and responsibility for the universal field of
natural etheric energy associated with the body-mind,
practices to develop emotional and physical sensitivity to
and responsibility for the etheric energy-connection between
psycho-physically living beings, and disciplines to develop
sensitivity to and responsibility for the deep psychic
aspect of mind.

Without the humanizing benefits of real love in the
context of the first three stages of life, and without the
inspiring benefits of true spiritual, transcendental, and
divine culture in the context of the first three stages of
life, human beings inevitably tend to develop un-happy
patterns in the context of the first three stages of life.
Such failures of love, wisdom, and happiness define human
existence subhumanly and limit human existence to the egoic
model and destiny. Therefore, relatively few adults advance
to the fourth stage of life in the most common world of
mankind, for the most common world of mankind tends to be
limited to and by the egoic society of the first three
stages of life. And religion in the most common world of
mankind is likewise defined and limited by the conceptual
and egoic tendencies of the first three stages of life.

………..

Adapted from The
Dawn Horse Testament
Chapter
16

Adi Da Samraj

………..


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Adi Da, Ramana Maharshi, Nityananda, Shridi Sai Baba, Upasani Baba,  Seshadri Swamigal , Meher Baba, Sivananda, Ramsuratkumar
“The perfect
among the sages is identical with Me. There is absolutely no
difference between us”
Tripura
Rahasya
,
Chap XX,
128-133


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